People of Color in European Art History


  1. Contemporary Art Week!
Volkan Baga 
Snapcaster Mage
Anyone who’s played a bit of Magic: The Gathering in the last few years will probably recognize the card art for Snapcaster Mage right away. It is, after all, one of the most powerful creature cards ever printed. Selling a play set of these at their height kept me in groceries for a week once upon a time.

But what many people don’t know is that this is actually a portrait of professional player Tiago Chan.
The Magic Invitational was a tournament held from 1997-2007, and the winner received as part of their prize a rather singular opportunity-to not only design a Magic card, but to have their portrait included in the card’s artwork. (The first winner, Olle Råde, didn’t “cash in” his prize until years after winning. WotC made an amusing condition: he must agree to be depicted with the long hair he had when he originally won on the art for Sylvan Safekeeper.)
You can view more on how the card was created and preliminary sketches for the final art here on the WotC website.

    Contemporary Art Week!

    Volkan Baga

    Snapcaster Mage

    Anyone who’s played a bit of Magic: The Gathering in the last few years will probably recognize the card art for Snapcaster Mage right away. It is, after all, one of the most powerful creature cards ever printed. Selling a play set of these at their height kept me in groceries for a week once upon a time.

    image

    But what many people don’t know is that this is actually a portrait of professional player Tiago Chan.

    The Magic Invitational was a tournament held from 1997-2007, and the winner received as part of their prize a rather singular opportunity-to not only design a Magic card, but to have their portrait included in the card’s artwork. (The first winner, Olle Råde, didn’t “cash in” his prize until years after winning. WotC made an amusing condition: he must agree to be depicted with the long hair he had when he originally won on the art for Sylvan Safekeeper.)

    You can view more on how the card was created and preliminary sketches for the final art here on the WotC website.

  2. mmex submitted to medievalpoc:

for Contemporary Art Week!
Kara Walker, from The Emancipation Approximation series, 2000. Screenprinted on paper.

official website

    mmex submitted to medievalpoc:

    for Contemporary Art Week!

    Kara Walker, from The Emancipation Approximation series, 2000. Screenprinted on paper.

    official website

  3. palaceofposey:

Maybe I’ll clean this up later.

Contemporary Art Week!
There are a lot of things to love about this piece, and I find it very easy to identify with. I kind of wonder if those of us out here writing, creating content, sharing knowledge and making articles, art, stories, and games had a battle flag, if it might look something like this.

    palaceofposey:

    Maybe I’ll clean this up later.

    Contemporary Art Week!

    There are a lot of things to love about this piece, and I find it very easy to identify with. I kind of wonder if those of us out here writing, creating content, sharing knowledge and making articles, art, stories, and games had a battle flag, if it might look something like this.

  4. Contemporary Art Week!

    S. Ross Browne

    Series: Self-Evident Truths

    from the artist’s statement:

    These paintings represent a modern study in dichotomy and perception from a historical context using portraiture as the interpretive engine.

    I often use the image of the black woman in unaccustomed/atypical context; derived to create a visual tension between historical fact, misinformation and myth. The viewer is lured into the possible narrative of the depicted figure by her beauty, strength and grace; however immediately enters an intellectual menagerie where they are confounded by the disconnected visual clues. Is she slave or slaveholder? Is she captive or free, is she servant or served? Is she factual or fictional in a historical context? All of these questions and more provide basis for the individual viewers journey of allegorical interpretation.

    The images are imbued with cultural and ethnic symbolism that provides insight into the historical context of the painting. Yet, the icons, combined with my personal visual vocabulary, may remain unseen or misread by the “unknowing” eye; the eye that never learned the historic bases for all the possibilities in the lives of these women. In a society that often make instant cultural judgements based on visual cues that are often stereotypical, but not always, I feel offering ethnic imagery that defies common visual library of the modern citizen may challenge each individuals biases and foregone conclusions of their own notions of what race represents in history and therefore in humanity.

    The images beg the question: Is “Truth” self-evident? Who’s “Truth”? How does knowledge, experience and perception of one’s “self” determine what is evident? If the view of oneself is skewed is it possible to see another clearly?

  5. fantasyofcolor:

Fairy Queen by ~tim-mcburnie

Contemporary Art Week!

    fantasyofcolor:

    Fairy Queen by ~tim-mcburnie

    Contemporary Art Week!

  6. "Things [Will Be] Like That, Back Then"

    blue-author:

    The thing that always gets me about the idea that the violence, racism, and misogyny in Game of Thrones is expected/excusable “because that’s how things were back then” isn’t just the fact that GoT isn’t a historical novel.

    If progress was a steady, linear acceleration through time, they should be way ahead of us. They should be far more enlightened in Westeros than we are in the United States or Europe. Looking at Westeros would be looking at our enlightened future, not our dismal past.

    "What are you talking about? It’s medieval fantasy."

    Right, but how many years of recorded human history does this “medieval” world have again?

    I don’t remember the exact figure, but I can tell you this much:

    image

    By the notion that human progress in a vaguely European setting should follow some sort of script moving from more brutal and bigoted to less, they should be well out of their “medieval period” and a couple thousand years ahead of us. There’s some give or take, depending on where you try to peg the “medieval phase” as starting. If we take the invasion of the First Men to be something like the Celts reaching the British Isles and displacing/killing the indigenous people, with the Andals then being analogous to either the Saxons or the French… culturally it seems more like the Norman invasion because the Andals seem “farther along”, but that moves the timeline up even further compared to ours.

    But forgetting the Andals: Celts settled in Britain no earlier than 2000 B.C., which puts them about 2,500 years before the beginning of the Ye Olde Medieval England that Westeros is supposed to be based on according to the theory of “how things were back then”. According to the mythic history of Westeros, the First Men crossed over *checks* around 12,000 years ago. If we peg that date as about 2,000 BCE in real-world terms, then the approximate start of the medieval period in Westeros (again, according to the theory that progress is a matter of counting years) would have to be 9,500 years ago. If all medieval periods are about the same—which again, is the underpinning of the theory that “things were just like that back then”—then this period would have given way to something like a renaissance about 1,000 years later, or around 8,500 years ago.

    Now, our renaissance kicked off about 500 years ago, so Westeros is about 8,000 years “more advanced” than we are.

    "But wait! You said ‘mythic history’! Nobody knows when the first men really arrived."

    By crumb, you’re right. Nobody does know that. But you know what they do know? When the wall went up. It’s been continuously staffed and watched by the same organization for a mind-blowing 8,000 years. If we wanted to get all meta, we could even imagine that formal written history in Westeros might have grown out of the Night’s Watch need to keep records.

    So the invasion of the First Men could have happened more recently than 12,000 years ago, but no sooner than 8,000 and the time it would take for them to get established across the continent. But even if we assume that they could have come over just in time to build the wall… okay, medieval period begins 2,500 years later. That’s 5,500 years ago. Renaissance begins 1,000 years after that, that’s 4,500 years ago.

    Even by the most generous estimate available, Westeros still has 4,000 years of enlightened modern living on us European-descended humans.

    Obviously the reason they aren’t 4,000 years more sophisticated and enlightened than we are is… well, it’s a fictional world whose author requires it to be “medieval” and brutal, but more to the point, progress doesn’t work this way. The only reason their society and history mirrors ours at all is that the author has dictated that they should. Seriously. The fact that they even count the turning of years the way we do is really bizarre. The idea that they would come up with the same sort of feudal agrarian culture that we did given the completely different growing seasons and completely different logistics of keeping the population fed is mind-boggling.

    We can—we must—accept that these things happened, because they are part of the premise of the story. But the narrative doesn’t assert that the sociopolitical progress of their world is somehow in a parallel, delayed synchronization with progress in ours, and in fact, it very obviously isn’t.

    The bottom line: Westeros is not in a medieval Europe phase of progress. It’s in a modern Westeros phase of it. Appealing to “things were like that back then” is no more meaningful an excuse than is saying “things are like that now” about a present situation.

    I really like the perspective you’ve added here. I’ve discussed the myth of linear social progress and the projection of that many people are willing to do onto fictional worlds, including that of GoT/ASOIAF. None of this would be necessary if it wasn’t for the bone-deep conviction on the part of some fans that this particular work of fiction can excuse it flaws and some very questionable choices on the part of the author with “but, historical accuracy!”

    In the end, the facts are that the books and the show are racist, misogynist, and violent because people chose to make it that way. These problems are compounded upon the insistence that these narrative choices are not only true to history or “realistic”, but the implication that the creators of the book/show are somehow fettered by or forced into these narrative choices.

  7. Contemporary Art Week!
Ephara, God of the Polis
Art by Eric Deschamps for Magic: The Gathering

    Contemporary Art Week!

    Ephara, God of the Polis

    Art by Eric Deschamps for Magic: The Gathering

  8. aintasuperhero:




“This is a painting I did for my little cousin who will soon be going through a bone marrow transplant. I hope that every time she looks at it she will feel brave and strong.”
Qavah the Brave by ~Wes-Talbott


OH MY GOODNESS


Contemporary Art Week!

    aintasuperhero:

    This is a painting I did for my little cousin who will soon be going through a bone marrow transplant. I hope that every time she looks at it she will feel brave and strong.”

    Qavah the Brave by ~Wes-Talbott

    OH MY GOODNESS

    Contemporary Art Week!

    (via girljanitor)

  9. Contemporary Art Week!

    Tamara Natalie Madden

    Madden lists among influences Gustav Klimt and images of Egyptian royalty. You can view many, many more images of her work here at her official website.

    I find these breathtaking acrylic and mixed media paintings evocative of both the Fayum Mummy Portraits and early medieval icons featuring the Black Madonna.

  10. mmex submitted to medievalpoc:

Contemporary Art Week!
Titus Kaphar
Conversation Between Paint

    mmex submitted to medievalpoc:

    Contemporary Art Week!

    Titus Kaphar

    Conversation Between Paint