People of Color in European Art History


  1. Albert Eckhout
Tapuya Man
Dutch Brazil, Netherlands (1641)
oil on canvas
265 × 157 cm
National Museum of Denmark
This Week on MedievalPOC: Eckhout’s series on Dutch BrazilAlbert Eckhout was a Netherlandish still-life painter commissioned by  John Maurice, Prince of Nassau-Siegen, to paint the plants, animals, and human beings that inhabited the newly colonized Brazil.
Here is what a professor teaching a course on colonial art in Brazil would like you to know about this painting:



Eckhout’s paintings also have historical value as well: this series contains the only available representations of the Tapuyas (Tarairius), a group which had died out by the beginning of the nineteenth century.



The Tapuya and other Indigenous people of Brazil beg to differ.

In fact, they are currently engaged in a desperate battle against being displaced by the Brazilian Government.

[forgive my terrible translation]


In recent days, a conflict occurring for years in the federal capital is finally making the news, a few pages of the mainstream press and relative attention of Brasilia. In the center of the dispute is the Northwest Sector, an area of environmental protection, with springs and rich flora and fauna. 
On one side is an indigenous community Fulni it Tapuya which states reside at the place for over 40 years and battle for recognition and demarcation of land. Another, contractors and Emplavi Brasal (and all political power that money can buy), interested in uplifting the newest and desirable neighborhood of upper middle class of Brasilia, where a square meter costs around £ 8000.



In 2011, an important Religious shrine of the Tupuya people was torn down in an attempt to displace the Tupuya:


The Action of GDF (Vice Governor Thaddeus Filipelli / PMDB-DF) and TERRACAP (Filipelli and Ivelise Longhi / PMDB-DF) that on August 16, 2011 raided, intimidated and destroyed part of the cerrado vegetation of indigenous land, violated indigenous rights, human rights and the Constitution, was an act of aggression in an attempt to deprive the indigenous community Tapuya the Shrine of the Shamans of its historic territory of traditional use, thus originating a deprivation of the right to land, a violation of the home, a violation of indigenous spiritual values, a violation of the memory and history of the indigenous presence Candanga and pioneer of the Holy Shrine of the Shamans in the Federal District.


These violations are ongoing, and are only increasing as Brazil moves forward with preparations to host the World Cup.
2013: Indigenous people who have been occupying a museum in protest of displacement since 2006 were forcibly evicted by police in March so that it could be torn down for use as a parking lot for the FIFA 2014 World Cup Stadium. The media refers to them as “squatters”.

“…the Tapuyas (Tarairius), a group which had died out by the beginning of the nineteenth century.”

“…the Tapuyas (Tarairius), a group which had died out by the beginning of the nineteenth century.”

“…the Tapuyas (Tarairius), a group which had died out by the beginning of the nineteenth century.”

You can go and view the painting of “The Last Tapuya” at the National Museum in Copenhagen.

Or, you can join in supporting the rights of the Indigenous peoples of Brazil, who are fighting for their lives right now.
Info:
BBC: Indigenous Brazilians Use Web to Fight for Their Rights
Brazil Dismantles Democracy in Assault on Indigenous Rights
Action:
Write to the Brazilian Government
Survival international
Indigenous blogs:
Diario Liberdade
A Verdade Do Sanctuario Dos Pajes
Global Voices Online

    Albert Eckhout

    Tapuya Man

    Dutch Brazil, Netherlands (1641)

    oil on canvas

    265 × 157 cm

    National Museum of Denmark

    This Week on MedievalPOC: Eckhout’s series on Dutch Brazil
    Albert Eckhout was a Netherlandish still-life painter commissioned by  John Maurice, Prince of Nassau-Siegen, to paint the plants, animals, and human beings that inhabited the newly colonized Brazil.

    Here is what a professor teaching a course on colonial art in Brazil would like you to know about this painting:

    Eckhout’s paintings also have historical value as well: this series contains the only available representations of the Tapuyas (Tarairius), a group which had died out by the beginning of the nineteenth century.

    The Tapuya and other Indigenous people of Brazil beg to differ.

    image

    In fact, they are currently engaged in a desperate battle against being displaced by the Brazilian Government.

    image

    [forgive my terrible translation]

    In recent days, a conflict occurring for years in the federal capital is finally making the news, a few pages of the mainstream press and relative attention of Brasilia. In the center of the dispute is the Northwest Sector, an area of environmental protection, with springs and rich flora and fauna.

    On one side is an indigenous community Fulni it Tapuya which states reside at the place for over 40 years and battle for recognition and demarcation of land. Another, contractors and Emplavi Brasal (and all political power that money can buy), interested in uplifting the newest and desirable neighborhood of upper middle class of Brasilia, where a square meter costs around £ 8000.

    image

    In 2011, an important Religious shrine of the Tupuya people was torn down in an attempt to displace the Tupuya:

    The Action of GDF (Vice Governor Thaddeus Filipelli / PMDB-DF) and TERRACAP (Filipelli and Ivelise Longhi / PMDB-DF) that on August 16, 2011 raided, intimidated and destroyed part of the cerrado vegetation of indigenous land, violated indigenous rights, human rights and the Constitution, was an act of aggression in an attempt to deprive the indigenous community Tapuya the Shrine of the Shamans of its historic territory of traditional use, thus originating a deprivation of the right to land, a violation of the home, a violation of indigenous spiritual values, a violation of the memory and history of the indigenous presence Candanga and pioneer of the Holy Shrine of the Shamans in the Federal District.

    These violations are ongoing, and are only increasing as Brazil moves forward with preparations to host the World Cup.

    2013: Indigenous people who have been occupying a museum in protest of displacement since 2006 were forcibly evicted by police in March so that it could be torn down for use as a parking lot for the FIFA 2014 World Cup Stadium. The media refers to them as “squatters”.

    image

    …the Tapuyas (Tarairius), a group which had died out by the beginning of the nineteenth century.”

    image

    …the Tapuyas (Tarairius), a group which had died out by the beginning of the nineteenth century.”

    image

    …the Tapuyas (Tarairius), a group which had died out by the beginning of the nineteenth century.”

    image

    You can go and view the painting of “The Last Tapuya” at the National Museum in Copenhagen.

    image

    Or, you can join in supporting the rights of the Indigenous peoples of Brazil, who are fighting for their lives right now.

    Info:

    BBC: Indigenous Brazilians Use Web to Fight for Their Rights

    Brazil Dismantles Democracy in Assault on Indigenous Rights

    Action:

    Write to the Brazilian Government

    Survival international

    Indigenous blogs:

    Diario Liberdade

    A Verdade Do Sanctuario Dos Pajes

    Global Voices Online