People of Color in European Art History


  1. maryrobinette:

medievalpoc:

Pieter Bruegel I
36 Plates Representing the Heads of Peasants: Black Peasant Couple
Netherlands (1658)
Print / Engraving on Copper - Illustration, 133 x 187 mm.
Wien, Graphische Sammlung Albertina.
From a series of 36 plates representing heads of peasants in Tooneel des Werelds ondeckende de Ongestuymigheden en Ydelheden in woorden ende wercken deser verdorvene Eeuwe op-geprongckt met aerdige en zinrijcke Versen. (Weesp: Albert Elias van Panhuysen, 1658), pl. 34: Bust-length portraits of a black man and a black woman, each within a medallion.
The Image of the Black in Western Art Research Project and Photo Archive, W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research, Harvard University

Well, crap. That means I totally could have had people of colour in Glamour in Glass. The whole “1815 and small town in the Netherlands” thing is clearly not a viable reason.

This is why I’m so glad that there are writers, artists and educators reading this blog. Historical or historically-inspired settings can be accurate AND diverse, especially considering media for a modern audience who deserve to feel like a part of the story.

    maryrobinette:

    medievalpoc:

    Pieter Bruegel I

    36 Plates Representing the Heads of Peasants: Black Peasant Couple

    Netherlands (1658)

    Print / Engraving on Copper - Illustration, 133 x 187 mm.

    Wien, Graphische Sammlung Albertina.

    From a series of 36 plates representing heads of peasants in Tooneel des Werelds ondeckende de Ongestuymigheden en Ydelheden in woorden ende wercken deser verdorvene Eeuwe op-geprongckt met aerdige en zinrijcke Versen. (Weesp: Albert Elias van Panhuysen, 1658), pl. 34: Bust-length portraits of a black man and a black woman, each within a medallion.

    The Image of the Black in Western Art Research Project and Photo Archive, W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research, Harvard University

    Well, crap. That means I totally could have had people of colour in Glamour in Glass. The whole “1815 and small town in the Netherlands” thing is clearly not a viable reason.

    This is why I’m so glad that there are writers, artists and educators reading this blog. Historical or historically-inspired settings can be accurate AND diverse, especially considering media for a modern audience who deserve to feel like a part of the story.