People of Color in European Art History


  1. "Unforgiven": The Rock Highlander Fic

    medievalpoc:

    aboyoficeandfire reblogged your photo:
    Vampire

    I demand fanfic immediately*

    (context)

    image

    * Highlander fic will also be acceptable

    THE HIGHLANDER FIC HAS BEEN WRITTEN AND YOU CAN READ IT HERE

  2. nonmodernist:

    bigbangpress:

    Here’s a picture from our first book, A Hero at the End of the World, written by Erin Claiborne (eleveninches) and illustrated by Jade Liebes (hydrae). The two guys in this photo are Ewan Mao and his former best friend Oliver Abrams.

    As a teenager, Ewan was prophesied to save Britain from an evil tyrant — but chickened out at the last moment. Instead, his best friend Oliver ended up defeating the villain. Five years later, Oliver is a national hero while Ewan works at a coffee shop and still lives with his parents. But the two friends are unwillingly reunited when a magical cult targets Ewan in a plot to end the world.

    A Hero at the End of the World is a hilarious and gripping combination of YA fantasy adventure, queer romance, and political satire. It will be published by Big Bang Press on November 11, and you can find out more on our website!

    fantasy adventure, queer romance, and political satire - this book is everything i’ve ever wanted in my YA fantasy loving heart

    Reblogging for the books tag!

    (via fantasyofcolor)

  3. gentlemanhobo wrote...

    Why did a french guy make a (dramatically inaccurate and heavily westernized) print of a Japanese temple in the 1700s? Frenchmen couldn't even legally visit japan at that time, so I doubt heavily it was directly inspired?

    Read this (via UCLA): The Early Enlightenment, Religious Toleration, and the Origins of Comparative Religion: Bernard and Picart’s Religious Ceremonies and Customs of All the Peoples of the World

    ^ It explains why/how the book this engraving is from was made, the effect it had, and a brief reading list (books about this book).

  4. sitcomofmylife wrote...

    Hi! I was looking thru your books and resources tags, and couldn't find what I'm looking for, so I thought I'd send an ask. Do you have any recommendations for "lies my teachers told me"-style books for high schoolers? I'd like to get something for my two cousins who are starting 9th grade. I wish I'd had a heads up that the curriculum is so whitewashed and plain wrong.

    hrhthebirthdayprincess:

    medievalpoc:

    Hmmm. You know, I work in college education, so I don’t always have resources at hand for slightly younger folks, although I try. If anyone has suggestions, please add them in the notes!

    Lies My Teacher Told Me and Lies Across America would probably interest high schoolers but to really spark an interest ninth graders may like poking around the author James Loewen’s website. http://sundown.afro.illinois.edu There’s articles and videos and a bunch of other stuff in the special features section that can lead them to the information in whatever way appeals most.

    Most of the readers in the notes seem to be of the opinion that the book is fine for high school age students; another book several recommended was Howard Zinn’s A People’s History of the United States. I personally am not a fan for various reasons, but your mileage may vary. (If people really NEED to know why, I think the overall tone of the text attempts the whole ‘equally puncturing the pomposity of history’ but it actually comes off pretty disrespectful to the histories of a lot of marginalized Americans. Coming out of the gate with “Arawak men and women, naked, tawny, and full of wonder…” is a pretty good way to make me stop reading your book.)

  5. clavisa submitted to medievalpoc:

    I don’t know if you do writing as well as art, but I’m reading the book Hild by Nicola Griffith and recently started following your blog, so when I came across this passage explicitly mentioning people of colour in northern England in the 700s (there are more later, but this was the first one that I noticed), I thought you might like to see it! 

    Thanks for the submission. I could wish it was more than a description of a crowd scene and actual characters, but at least there’s some kind of acknowledgement…

  6. shadesofmauve:

    rainydaypaperback:

    shadesofmauve:

    songscloset:

    nihilisme:

    ittybittylittleworld:

    punkasslouis:

    I just watched a kid break down in the bookstore because his books for the semester totaled $600 and that’s the american university system in a nutshell

    I was on the verge of tears when I got to the cashier so yeah, that’s messed up

    Go here and just, don’t waste any more money okay?

    While I entirely support following that link, I also suggest going to Abe Books or Book Depository or even eBay to see if there are inexpensive print versions of books you need. I haven’t paid full-price for any of my texts while I’m in school… because that would DOUBLE the cost of school.

    I use the ISBN of the require books and search the cheap sites for them.

    Good luck out there, guys!

    Paging FenrisLorsrai! Come work your resource magic on this post!

    I HAVE BEEN SUMMONED. (but I’ll post on my actual bookstore account)

    Quick anddirty meta search for books: Addall. it’ll crawl 40+ book sites at once including ABE, ALibris, Amazon, Half in both domestic AND foreign versions.

    Meta search #2! GetTextbooks.com which focuses specifically on textbooks. It omits some foreign sites that AddAll includes, BUT it also includes a whole bunch of rentals as well.  Renting is probably the most cost effective method overall.

    NOW, HOW TO SEARCH!

    First determine a few things:

    • Make sure you have the ISBN
    • IF IT IS A BUNDLE: Determine if you need a software key/CD/workbook/lab book or not.  Many times you do not.  Math classes increasingly NEED the software key, but more on that later
    • ASK THE PROFESSOR: If this is not the first edition of the book, can you use a previous edition?  One edition back is generally half the cost of current, two is generally about 1/8th the cost.  Generally you can get away with this if its material that doesn’t change rapidly. Your course on the Civil War, you can probably use two editions back. Your computer programming class on latest greatest language… you probably need newest edition.
    • FOR LITERATURE CLASSES: determine if you book is from before 1929. If it is, its in public domain, you can almost certain get a free copy online.  If they want a SPECIFIC copy for an essay bundled with book, see below.

    Now, run your search by ISBN using the two metasearch sites.  Open them in separate tabs.  

    gettextbooks shows you WITH the shipping, Addall does NOT show you the shipping.  keep this in mind when you’re comparing.  You’ll see a lot of duplication.  GetTextbooks will also show you SOME variants.

    Now that you have those open, open two more tabs.  Run a second search on same two sites using the author and exact title you picked up from search #1.  This will show you all the international editions and weird bundles that don’t exactly match the ISBN of the bookstore

    WHAT THE HELL IS AN INTERNATIONAL EDITION: its a paperback version of the US version with an angry notice on the cover saying “NOT FOR SALE OUTSIDE INDONESIA”. Its the same book, but way cheaper.  ignore the angry warning, the US Supreme Court has your back. NO, REALLY. Right of first sale, baby!  ignore the angry warning and you basically have same book, it just isn’t printed with ink made from student tears and unobtanium.

    Now filter results based on whether you need any Extra materials or not. 

    IF YOU DO NEED THE EXTRA MATERIALS: this is where it gets tricky. an intact bundle is generally the most expensive option or near top end of price curve.  If you NEED the other materials, you may be able to get them cheaper in pieces.  and you can buy mismatched pieces!

    Say for example you need a math textbook, but need the software key for the math problem program.  The professor said you can use older book.  Buy a math book that one or more editions back and then buy the software key separately from the SOFTWARE manufacturer.  You’ll find the software keys on booksites all by themselves, but they’re generally way more expensive than buying the key direct from software manufacturer. and no shipping then!

    NOW A WORD ON LITERATURE: sometimes profs want you to get a specific edition of something to read a specific essay in the book. You have about 50/50 odds that the essay is in the front of the book. IF IT IS, you may be able to read the essay on Amazon by going to that books page and clicking on the “look inside”.  They generally preview between 10-30 pages of books and that often means its the essay you needed, not the actually BODY of the book.  So you can look up the specific copy of Frankenstein on Amazon, read the essay, then download a free different version from Project Gutenberg.

    FOR RECENT NONFICTION, make sure you have an up to date library card for your HOME library and the LOCAL city library where your college is.  Many have digital loans available, where you can check out the ebook for free and popular nonfiction is frequently available that way.

    IF YOU CAN GET YOUR BOOKLIST BEFORE GOING TO SCHOOL: shop for the mundane things locally first.  There will be 50 people in CollegeTown looking for that book, you may be the only one in your home town.  supply and demand, if you found it in collegetown, it may be 10X price of your local bookstore.

    and check you local library as well!  You may be able to check out some of those books from your local library and take them to school with you and renew them online one or more times, depending on how in demand they are.  There will be NO copies in CollegeTown library because there’s 50 people asking for it.  But your HOME town, you may be able to renew it twice since its low demand. Write on your calender when they’re due or need to be renewed.  Renew them OR tuck the whole pile into a Priority Mail flat rate box and send them home to your folks.  The cost of the priority box to send several library books home is probably way less than what you’d pay for them. (or if its stuff you know you need AFTER a break where you’ll be home, request a hold from school, pick up at home)

    ONE LAST WORD BEFORE YOU BUY…

    You determined you HAVE to buy a book and you’ve narrowed it down to a few choices of source.  Run a search for “coupon + Sitename” what looked like the lowest priced may not if you find a coupon for the 2nd or 3rd lowest priced option. Gettextbook will generate some automatically, but you may be able to find even better ones.

    So make yourself some food, get a beverage, put on some tunes and compare prices!

    and if you’re reached point of wanting to curl up in a ball and die, you can send us an ask with the ISBN for your book and answers to questions aobe (extra materials, previous edition, etc) and we’ll send you back an note with a link to the cheapest one we can find.  I do this for a living, send an ask and I’ll get it done usually within about 12 hours.

    WHOOP WHOOP MASSIVE EXCELLENT RESOURCE ADVICE ABOVE!!!!

    (via cypheroftyr)

  7. sitcomofmylife wrote...

    Hi! I was looking thru your books and resources tags, and couldn't find what I'm looking for, so I thought I'd send an ask. Do you have any recommendations for "lies my teachers told me"-style books for high schoolers? I'd like to get something for my two cousins who are starting 9th grade. I wish I'd had a heads up that the curriculum is so whitewashed and plain wrong.

    Hmmm. You know, I work in college education, so I don’t always have resources at hand for slightly younger folks, although I try. If anyone has suggestions, please add them in the notes!

  8. aresnergal:

medievalpoc:

lyricsja:


EUROPEANS TAUGHT FOR CENTURIES that Africa had no written history, literature or philosophy (claiming Egypt was other than African). When roughly 1 MILLION manuscripts were found in Timbuktu/Mali covering , according to Reuters “all the fields of human knowledge: law, the sciences, medicine,” IT DID NOT MAKE MAINSTREAM NEWS as did the lies taught by Europeans concerning Africa


Someone asked me to somehow “verify” that this story is real.
Of course it’s real! The PROBLEM with the coverage regarding these manuscripts is that they’re constantly portrayed as being in “danger” because many of them are still in the possession of Malian descendants. About 700,000 have been cataloged so far, and they have had to be moved in part because apparently extremist groups have tried to firebomb them. Many others are still in the possession of the families they have been passed down in.
Some of these collected manuscripts are being housed in exile, but mold and humidity have been a constant threat. They have been raising funds to try and preserve these manuscripts-you can read more about the project to house and protect them here.
A bit of the history of these manuscripts from National Geographic:


These sacred manuscripts covered an array of subjects: astronomy, medicine, mathematics, chemistry, judicial law, government, and Islamic conflict resolution. Islamic study during this period of human history, when the intellectual evolution had stalled in the rest of Europe was growing, evolving, and breaking new ground in the fields of science, mathematics, astronomy, law, and philosophy within the Muslim world.
By the 1300s the “Ambassadors of Peace” centered around the University of Timbuktu created roving scholastic campuses and religious schools of learning that traveled between the cities of Timbuktu, Gao, and Djénné, helping to serve as a model of peaceful governance throughout an often conflict-riddled tribal region.
 At its peak, over 25,000 students attended the University of Timbuktu. 
By the beginning of the 1600s with the Moroccan invasions from the north, however, the scholars of Timbuktu began to slowly drift away and study elsewhere. As a result, the city’s sacred manuscripts began to fall into disrepair. While Islamic teachings there continued for another 300 years, the biggest decline in scholastic study occurred with the French colonization of present-day Mali in the late 1890s. 


So yeah, basically the story of this collection’s source more or less ends with “…but unfortunately, colonialism”, as do most of the great cities of Africa, the Americas, and some parts of Asia.
Also, as an additional consideration:


With the pressures of poverty, a series of droughts, and a tribal Tureg rebellion in Mali that lasted over ten years, the manuscripts continue to disappear into the black market, where they are illegally sold to private and university collections in Europe and the United States. 


Notice where the blame is placed here via language use: on the people in poverty forced to sell their treasures, as opposed to the Universities in Europe and the U.S. buying them.
It’s really just another face of Neocolonialism.

Fun fact: I only learned about that library by playing one of the Civilization games where it exists as a wonder

One of the many reasons why Medievalpoc is also about representation in all types of media.
One of the most important ways the past affects us all today is the media we create about it. History is a story, and a story bears the mark of each teller it passes through. So, each time we tell a story, we have the power to shape it as it passes through us, to others.
Whether we’re writing textbooks, fiction, or articles; sharing something on Facebook, teaching a class, playing a game, or texting our moms, we make choices in how we phrase things and frame information. When you hold things in your mind, like the Library of Timbuktu, and think about how it interacts with everything else you know, it will affect your words and behavior, which in turn affects the people around you.
As I wrote about yesterday, Colonialism in many ways involves telling lies about entire nations and peoples, and using power, ruthlessness, and brutality to make them into almost-truths. After all, if you burn the manuscripts of an entire people and then tell them they have no history; if you make teaching what remains of their history illegal, is that not violence? Is that not genocide?
I’m sure there are those who would call that an exaggeration or hyperbole, but these are often the selfsame folks who are moved to violence to defend the idea the European history is populated entirely and without exception by people we in the U.S. would consider white today. We can pretend all we like that this vision of an all-white historical Europe came from nothing, no one, and nowhere, as if it is undiluted truth that comes to us untainted by centuries of colonialism. But the facts are that you can point to specific moments, authors, and articles that show the turning points; that show these ideas being born. You can read Race Mixture in the Roman Empire by Frank Tenney (from 1916) and see how articles like these shaped American views of race in antiquity; how the racism of 1916 was imposed onto Classical Antiquity. And these are the same people who decided that an entire continent did not have books, had no written history.
Why do we know what we know? Where does it come from? And how does the media we are creating today reflect it?

    aresnergal:

    medievalpoc:

    lyricsja:

    EUROPEANS TAUGHT FOR CENTURIES that Africa had no written history, literature or philosophy (claiming Egypt was other than African). When roughly 1 MILLION manuscripts were found in Timbuktu/Mali covering , according to Reuters “all the fields of human knowledge: law, the sciences, medicine,” IT DID NOT MAKE MAINSTREAM NEWS as did the lies taught by Europeans concerning Africa

    Someone asked me to somehow “verify” that this story is real.

    Of course it’s real! The PROBLEM with the coverage regarding these manuscripts is that they’re constantly portrayed as being in “danger” because many of them are still in the possession of Malian descendants. About 700,000 have been cataloged so far, and they have had to be moved in part because apparently extremist groups have tried to firebomb them. Many others are still in the possession of the families they have been passed down in.

    Some of these collected manuscripts are being housed in exile, but mold and humidity have been a constant threat. They have been raising funds to try and preserve these manuscripts-you can read more about the project to house and protect them here.

    A bit of the history of these manuscripts from National Geographic:

    These sacred manuscripts covered an array of subjects: astronomy, medicine, mathematics, chemistry, judicial law, government, and Islamic conflict resolution. Islamic study during this period of human history, when the intellectual evolution had stalled in the rest of Europe was growing, evolving, and breaking new ground in the fields of science, mathematics, astronomy, law, and philosophy within the Muslim world.

    By the 1300s the “Ambassadors of Peace” centered around the University of Timbuktu created roving scholastic campuses and religious schools of learning that traveled between the cities of Timbuktu, Gao, and Djénné, helping to serve as a model of peaceful governance throughout an often conflict-riddled tribal region.

    At its peak, over 25,000 students attended the University of Timbuktu.

    By the beginning of the 1600s with the Moroccan invasions from the north, however, the scholars of Timbuktu began to slowly drift away and study elsewhere. As a result, the city’s sacred manuscripts began to fall into disrepair. While Islamic teachings there continued for another 300 years, the biggest decline in scholastic study occurred with the French colonization of present-day Mali in the late 1890s.

    So yeah, basically the story of this collection’s source more or less ends with “…but unfortunately, colonialism”, as do most of the great cities of Africa, the Americas, and some parts of Asia.

    Also, as an additional consideration:

    With the pressures of poverty, a series of droughts, and a tribal Tureg rebellion in Mali that lasted over ten years, the manuscripts continue to disappear into the black market, where they are illegally sold to private and university collections in Europe and the United States.

    Notice where the blame is placed here via language use: on the people in poverty forced to sell their treasures, as opposed to the Universities in Europe and the U.S. buying them.

    It’s really just another face of Neocolonialism.

    Fun fact: I only learned about that library by playing one of the Civilization games where it exists as a wonder

    One of the many reasons why Medievalpoc is also about representation in all types of media.

    One of the most important ways the past affects us all today is the media we create about it. History is a story, and a story bears the mark of each teller it passes through. So, each time we tell a story, we have the power to shape it as it passes through us, to others.

    Whether we’re writing textbooks, fiction, or articles; sharing something on Facebook, teaching a class, playing a game, or texting our moms, we make choices in how we phrase things and frame information. When you hold things in your mind, like the Library of Timbuktu, and think about how it interacts with everything else you know, it will affect your words and behavior, which in turn affects the people around you.

    As I wrote about yesterday, Colonialism in many ways involves telling lies about entire nations and peoples, and using power, ruthlessness, and brutality to make them into almost-truths. After all, if you burn the manuscripts of an entire people and then tell them they have no history; if you make teaching what remains of their history illegal, is that not violence? Is that not genocide?

    I’m sure there are those who would call that an exaggeration or hyperbole, but these are often the selfsame folks who are moved to violence to defend the idea the European history is populated entirely and without exception by people we in the U.S. would consider white today. We can pretend all we like that this vision of an all-white historical Europe came from nothing, no one, and nowhere, as if it is undiluted truth that comes to us untainted by centuries of colonialism. But the facts are that you can point to specific moments, authors, and articles that show the turning points; that show these ideas being born. You can read Race Mixture in the Roman Empire by Frank Tenney (from 1916) and see how articles like these shaped American views of race in antiquity; how the racism of 1916 was imposed onto Classical Antiquity. And these are the same people who decided that an entire continent did not have books, had no written history.

    Why do we know what we know? Where does it come from? And how does the media we are creating today reflect it?

  9. tamorapierce:

diasporicroots:



African Mathematics: History, Textbook and Classroom Lessons 

by  Mr Robin Walker  (Author),     Mr John Matthews  (Contributor)  

Mathematics has an interesting history in Africa. The earliest known mathematical artefact in human history is the Lebombo Bone. Thought to be 37,000 years old, it was discovered by archaeologists in South Africa. Scholars believe that the number system carved into the bone represents a lunar calendar. Later mathematical evidence comes from the Ishango region of Central Africa, Ancient Egypt, Medieval North Africa, Ethiopia, Medieval West Africa and Medieval Central Africa.
This book covers the origin and evolution of mathematics in Africa and provides teachers/students with study materials that can be used in  classrooms and workshops.
Click the link to purchase: http://www.amazon.com/African-Mathematics-History-Textbook-Classroom/dp/1500667390

For the math and science geeks among us!

Math and Science Week!

    tamorapierce:

    diasporicroots:

    African Mathematics: History, Textbook and Classroom Lessons

    Mathematics has an interesting history in Africa. The earliest known mathematical artefact in human history is the Lebombo Bone. Thought to be 37,000 years old, it was discovered by archaeologists in South Africa. Scholars believe that the number system carved into the bone represents a lunar calendar. Later mathematical evidence comes from the Ishango region of Central Africa, Ancient Egypt, Medieval North Africa, Ethiopia, Medieval West Africa and Medieval Central Africa.

    This book covers the origin and evolution of mathematics in Africa and provides teachers/students with study materials that can be used in  classrooms and workshops.

    Click the link to purchase: http://www.amazon.com/African-Mathematics-History-Textbook-Classroom/dp/1500667390

    For the math and science geeks among us!

    Math and Science Week!

    (via knitmeapony)

  10. disabilityinkidlit:

    In response to this Tumblr ask from rampyourvoice to gradientlair

    Ten YA novels featuring disabled women of color as protagonists:

    A Time to Dance by Padma Venkatraman
    Akata Witch by Nnedi Okorafor
    Dangerous by Shannon Hale
    The Drowned Cities by Paolo Bacigalupi
    The Shattering by Karen Healey
    Pinned by Sharon G. Flake
    Bleeding Violet by Dia Reeves
    Otherbound by Corinne Duyvis
    When Reason Breaks by Cindy L. Rodriguez
    The Unbecoming of Mara Dyer by Michelle Hodkin

    So far, we’ve only reviewed Dangerous at Disability in Kidlit; we’re unfortunately unable to vouch for the others. Hopefully this list will still prove useful to some, though—and if you’ve read any of these, please pitch in with your thoughts!

    For the books tag OMG

    (via thebigblackwolfe)