People of Color in European Art History


  1. lascasbookshelf:

FREE BOOK!
Slavery and the English Country House
Madge Dresser and Andrew Hann (eds.)English Heritage, 2013
Download PDF
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||| Publisher’s blurb ||| 
The British country house has long been regarded as the jewel in the nation’s heritage crown. But the country house is also an expression of wealth and power, and as scholars reconsider the nation’s colonial past, new questions are being posed about these great houses and their links to Atlantic slavery.
This book, authored by a range of academics and heritage professionals, grew out of a 2009 conference on ‘Slavery and the British Country house: mapping the current research’ organised by English Heritage in partnership with the University of the West of England, the National Trust and the Economic History Society. It asks what links might be established between the wealth derived from slavery and the British country house and what implications such links should have for the way such properties are represented to the public today.In order to improve access to this research, a complete copy of the text is free to download from the left hand side of this page.
more from English Heritage
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    lascasbookshelf:

    FREE BOOK!

    Slavery and the English Country House

    Madge Dresser and Andrew Hann (eds.)
    English Heritage, 2013

    Download PDF

    more FREE BOOKS from lascasbookshelf.tumblr.com

    ||| Publisher’s blurb ||| 

    The British country house has long been regarded as the jewel in the nation’s heritage crown. But the country house is also an expression of wealth and power, and as scholars reconsider the nation’s colonial past, new questions are being posed about these great houses and their links to Atlantic slavery.

    This book, authored by a range of academics and heritage professionals, grew out of a 2009 conference on ‘Slavery and the British Country house: mapping the current research’ organised by English Heritage in partnership with the University of the West of England, the National Trust and the Economic History Society. It asks what links might be established between the wealth derived from slavery and the British country house and what implications such links should have for the way such properties are represented to the public today.

    In order to improve access to this research, a complete copy of the text is free to download from the left hand side of this page.

    more from English Heritage

    ||| Contents |||

    Read More

  2. lascasbookshelf:

FREE BOOK!
 Local Black History: A Beginning in DevonLucy MacKeithArchives and Museum of Black Heritage, Brixton, 2003
READ ONLINE
more FREE BOOKS from lascasbookshelf.tumblr.com
||| Publisher’s Blurb |||This booklet about black history in Devonshire is short because the work is only just beginning, not because there is no evidence to uncover… To move towards a more accurate, inclusive view of history, we need to separate out the different elements, which have been ignored previously. The evidence is available. The history waits to be written. Black history is not only for black people. It is not only to be found in the history of big cities and ports. Looking at black history in Devon, and similar parts of Britain, helps us to understand the links between local, national and world history. There are stories about black people to be discovered in all walks of life and in all areas. I hope to show that there is more to discover and that we need this information to get a balanced view of our country, and our country’s past. This is the ‘missing part of our history’.
||| Contents |||
Read More

    lascasbookshelf:

    FREE BOOK!

    Local Black History: A Beginning in Devon
    Lucy MacKeith
    Archives and Museum of Black Heritage, Brixton, 2003

    READ ONLINE

    more FREE BOOKS from lascasbookshelf.tumblr.com

    ||| Publisher’s Blurb |||
    This booklet about black history in Devonshire is short because the work is only just beginning, not because there is no evidence to uncover… To move towards a more accurate, inclusive view of history, we need to separate out the different elements, which have been ignored previously. The evidence is available. The history waits to be written. Black history is not only for black people. It is not only to be found in the history of big cities and ports. Looking at black history in Devon, and similar parts of Britain, helps us to understand the links between local, national and world history. There are stories about black people to be discovered in all walks of life and in all areas. I hope to show that there is more to discover and that we need this information to get a balanced view of our country, and our country’s past. This is the ‘missing part of our history’.

    ||| Contents |||

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  3. qarnaim wrote...

    Hey, do you know where that info on Cleopatra came from? Because everything I've ever been able to find has said that her mother was Cleopatra-V-Tryphaena, her father, Ptolemy-XII-Auletes' cousin. Both members of a !!Racist, Inbred, Colonizing!! Greek(with possibly a little Persian but no coptic) dynasty. Her speaking Egyptian does not actually necessitate Egyptian ancestry, and if there is any new information, we'd all like to see something other than just begging-the-question type statements.

    *smacks forehead*

    This has to be the ultimate proof that people just…don’t understand…what “sources” are. I literally gave you a page. number.

    look, here we’ve got the post, right?:

    image

    Okay now look at this part very carefully:

    image

    That’s the name of the book and all the information you need to find the book. And I give you the PAGE on which you can find this information, okay? Here:

    image

    Got it? Okay, let’s grab the book. you can get your very own copy of it here.

    Got your book?

    image

    Alright. Now, let’s carefully turn to PAGE 11:

    image

    Okay, let’s look around for a minute to see if it says anything about CLEOPATRA, and if you’re using the PDF, you can use the search function of whatever PDF viewer you use to search out relevant terms!

    Here we go:

    image

    Whoa, there it is! Right on page 11!

    But wait, what about the rest of that stuff? Well, it says “7” right after “Greek”, so let’s check it out at the bottom of the page, where the footnotes are listed with numbers so you can find them easily!

    Here we go!

    image

    WE DID IT!!!! WE FOUND WHERE THAT INFORMATION CAME FROM!

    Now can we please, please, PLEASE stop pretending like all the information I have here was either pulled out from my butt at random, or somehow is just UTTERLY unsourcable, unfindable, or inherently mysterious, or “questionable” or otherwise just floating around with no rhyme or reason whatsoever. Okay? Okay.

  4. ☛ Win a Signed Copy of the Tankborn Trilogy!

    Hello all! Tu Books is the YA and middle-grade of LEE & LOW Books, focused on diverse fantasy, sci-fi and mystery! You can enter to win the TANKBORN trilogy by Karen Sandler! 

    This contest ends Monday, October 20th. 

  5. lascasbookshelf:

lascasartoris:

FREE BOOKyeah I said 
FREE BOOK!!
Black London: Life Before Emancipation by Gretchen Gerzina (1995)A glimpse into the lives of the thousands of Africans living in eighteenth century London. 
Download PDF
Read online
More information

more FREE BOOKS from lascasbookshelf.tumblr.com
||| Publisher’s Blurb |||
Gerzina has written a fascinating account of London blacks, focusing on the late 18th and early 19th centuries. Because of a paucity of sources from blacks themselves, Gerzina had to rely primarily on glimpses through white eyes, especially those of antislavery advocate Granville Sharp. Gerzina is quite adept at culling evidence of a rich, complex black life, with significant interaction (and intermarriage) with the white community.
more from Rutger’s University Press
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    lascasbookshelf:

    lascasartoris:

    FREE BOOK
    yeah I said

    FREE BOOK!!


    Black London: Life Before Emancipation by Gretchen Gerzina (1995)
    A glimpse into the lives of the thousands of Africans living in eighteenth century London. 

    Download PDF

    Read online

    More information

    more FREE BOOKS from lascasbookshelf.tumblr.com

    ||| Publisher’s Blurb |||

    Gerzina has written a fascinating account of London blacks, focusing on the late 18th and early 19th centuries. Because of a paucity of sources from blacks themselves, Gerzina had to rely primarily on glimpses through white eyes, especially those of antislavery advocate Granville Sharp. Gerzina is quite adept at culling evidence of a rich, complex black life, with significant interaction (and intermarriage) with the white community.

    more from Rutger’s University Press

    ||| Contents |||

    Read More

  6. lascasartoris:

    I’ve been procrastinating all morning - so here… 

    MORE
    FREE 
    BOOKS!!!

    West Indians Intellectuals in Britain
 
    by Bill Schwarz

    Manchester University Press, 2003 

    Revealing the African Presence in Renaissance Europe
    The Walters Arts Museum, 2013

    Pan-African History: Political Figures from Africa and the Diaspora since 1787.
    Hakim Adi and Marika Sherwood. 
    Routledge, 2003. 

    One of the Children: Gay Black Men in Harlem
    William G. Hawkeswood, Alex W. Costley
    University of California Press, 1996

    The Making of the New Negro: Black Authorship, Masculinity, and Sexuality in the Harlem Renaissance
    Anna Pochmara
    Amsterdam University Press, 2011

    ‪African-American Artists, 1929-1945‬: ‪Prints, Drawings, and Paintings in the Metropolitan Museum of Art‬
    Lisa Mintz Messinger
    Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2003  

    (via dynastylnoire)

  7. lascasbookshelf:

FREE BOOK!
 Revealing the African Presence in Renaissance EuropeThe Walters Art Museum, Baltimore, 2012
Download PDF
more FREE BOOKS from lascasbookshelf.tumblr.com
||| Publisher’s Blurb |||
Book to accompany the 2012 exhibition Revealing the African Presence in Renaissance Europe. It was the first exhibition to bring together a wide variety of works of art in diverse mediums that bear witness to the multiple aspects of the African presence in Europe in the Age of Exploration. The book includes European paintings, sculptures, drawings, prints, books, and decorative objects, dating from around 1480 to around 1605, includes memorable images and riveting portraits of Africans, some of whose identities are known and others who remain anonymous.
||| Contents |||
Read More

    lascasbookshelf:

    FREE BOOK!

    Revealing the African Presence in Renaissance Europe
    The Walters Art Museum, Baltimore, 2012

    Download PDF

    more FREE BOOKS from lascasbookshelf.tumblr.com

    ||| Publisher’s Blurb |||

    Book to accompany the 2012 exhibition Revealing the African Presence in Renaissance Europe. It was the first exhibition to bring together a wide variety of works of art in diverse mediums that bear witness to the multiple aspects of the African presence in Europe in the Age of Exploration. The book includes European paintings, sculptures, drawings, prints, books, and decorative objects, dating from around 1480 to around 1605, includes memorable images and riveting portraits of Africans, some of whose identities are known and others who remain anonymous.

    ||| Contents |||

    Read More

  8. terahedun:

    A Showcase of Diversity from Indie Science Fiction, Fantasy & Speculative Fiction Authors

    For Medieval POC’s Diverse Fiction Week

    Sometimes it’s just nice to be represented on covers. I’ve found quite a few Indie Authors who’ve made an effort to ensure that people of color are represented in their stories and on their covers. Each of the following books are either the first in their series or standalones.

    Third Daughter by Susan Kaye Quinn: A steampunk trilogy set in an alternate east-Indian world.

    Blades Of Magic by Terah Edun: A high fantasy series with a sword-wielding protagonist who doesn’t wait to be saved.

    Justice Calling by Annie Bellet: A Native American sorceress in Idaho who’s an unabashed gamer nerd.

    Forever Mine by Elizabeth Reyes: A stunning contemporary romance with Latino protagonists.

    Fall of Sky City by S.M. Blooding: An adventurous steampunk series that sets sail on airships in an East Asian setting.

    Girl With Flying Weapons: An assassin-in-training stars in a cozy mystery set in 9th-Century China.

    The Ghost of Josiah Grimshaw by Suzy Turner: Two adopted sisters work together to fight off supernatural evils in London.

    What Kills Me by Wynne Channing: An urban fantasy series with a sassy Asian vampire who finds herself the hunted prey of a legendary prophecy.

    The Queen Bee of Bridgeton by Leslie DuBois: A young ballerina transitions from living in a poor urban community when she wins a full-scholarship to a top-tier school.

    The Preacher’s Promise by Piper Huguley: A schoolteacher’s journey through the post-Civil War South in a harrowing effort to uplift her race.

    This is fantastic, thanks for tagging!

  9. Fiction Week!
Who Fears Death by Nnedi Okarafor
From GoodReads (CN: rape, genocide):

An award-winning literary author presents her first foray into supernatural fantasy with a novel of post- apocalyptic Africa.  In a far future, post-nuclear-holocaust Africa, genocide plagues one region. The aggressors, the Nuru, have decided to follow the Great Book and exterminate the Okeke. But when the only surviving member of a slain Okeke village is brutally raped, she manages to escape, wandering farther into the desert. She gives birth to a baby girl with hair and skin the color of sand and instinctively knows that her daughter is different. She names her daughter Onyesonwu, which means “Who Fears Death?” in an ancient African tongue. Reared under the tutelage of a mysterious and traditional shaman, Onyesonwu discovers her magical destiny-to end the genocide of her people. The journey to fulfill her destiny will force her to grapple with nature, tradition, history, true love, the spiritual mysteries of her culture-and eventually death itself.

    Fiction Week!

    Who Fears Death by Nnedi Okarafor

    From GoodReads (CN: rape, genocide):

    An award-winning literary author presents her first foray into supernatural fantasy with a novel of post- apocalyptic Africa.

    In a far future, post-nuclear-holocaust Africa, genocide plagues one region. The aggressors, the Nuru, have decided to follow the Great Book and exterminate the Okeke. But when the only surviving member of a slain Okeke village is brutally raped, she manages to escape, wandering farther into the desert. She gives birth to a baby girl with hair and skin the color of sand and instinctively knows that her daughter is different. She names her daughter Onyesonwu, which means “Who Fears Death?” in an ancient African tongue.

    Reared under the tutelage of a mysterious and traditional shaman, Onyesonwu discovers her magical destiny-to end the genocide of her people. The journey to fulfill her destiny will force her to grapple with nature, tradition, history, true love, the spiritual mysteries of her culture-and eventually death itself.

  10. bowlerhatscience wrote...

    Forgive me if you've covered this one already, but I wanted to plug China Miéville's YA fantasy/weird fiction novel "Un Lun Dun". The hero of the book is a young girl of color named Deeba Resham, who is an amazing character all around.

    GoodReads page here

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